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Executive Protection Academy

Executive Protection Academy

Attack at the Airport: Armored vehicles, not shootings, are the basis for security in transfers.

Not even a month has passed since a shooting during an attempted vehicle robbery in the Santa Fe area of Mexico City, where an escort was seriously wounded when repelling the aggression from his (unarmored) vehicle, when there has already been another unfortunate and very similar case.

On Friday, October 15, two men on board a motorcycle shot at a luxury van, also unarmored, in which businessman Eduardo Beaven, owner of a chain of restaurants, was a passenger and who, together with his escort, was injured and taken to a hospital in the Observatorio area. The vehicle was hit by several bullets, while the motorcycle used by the assailants was severely damaged after being dragged several meters on the asphalt.

This time the driver, using the vehicle as a defensive weapon, ran over and dragged the assailants through the traffic circle at Terminal 2 of the Mexico City International Airport (AICM). One of the criminals lost his life minutes after being admitted to the hospital due to injuries sustained during the attempted robbery; the other individuals who managed to flee are being sought by agents of the Mexico City Security Secretariat. Both the businessman and his escort are in stable condition after the accident.

Newspaper reports also indicate that the aggression was repelled with firearms from the assaulted vehicle.

This time the driver, using the vehicle as a defensive weapon, ran over and dragged the assailants through the traffic circle at Terminal 2 of the Mexico City International Airport (AICM). One of the criminals lost his life minutes after being admitted to the hospital due to injuries sustained during the attempted robbery; the other individuals who managed to flee are being sought by agents of the Mexico City Security Secretariat. Both the businessman and his escort are in stable condition after the accident.

Newspaper reports also indicate that the aggression was repelled with firearms from the assaulted vehicle.

 

Two conclusions can be drawn from this unfortunate situation:

  1. The best weapon at the disposal of a properly trained security driver is his vehicle.
  2. To reduce the risks of an assault or attack, the armored vehicle is an essential tool that cannot be replaced by a firearm that, in an unarmored vehicle, can generate more problems than solutions, as we have seen in other cases of assault; such examples are the aggressions against the escort of Sergio "Checo" Perez, or the recent shootings in Santa Fe and at the Airport.

The executive protection is a planning and logistical process with the objective of reducing the user's exposure to risk, but not to expose him to the sometimes gratuitous shootings where his life is at stake. Every tool in the executive protection The two have their raison d'être within the operational scheme and we cannot use one to substitute the other or to try to economize resources, which is often the case when trying to substitute an armored vehicle with an armed agent.

Only the right combination of different tools can reduce the risks to an optimal level within a executive protection.

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